Dual split screen and other women

Dual split screen and other women

I enjoyed Conversations with other women the other night. Some viewers seem to like the split screen, and others apparently think it gets in the way of the story or are to gimmicky. Personally I liked it, primarily for one reason: I’m fed up with watching what the director wants me to watch. I’m a lot more interested in reaction than performance for instance. That is, if someone is making a speech, the camera is usually on him/her. Problem is, I’ve seen this numerous of times. Even in reality I often watch that person more of politeness than personal interest. What I want to do is watch other peoples reactions. In an ordinary movie I rarely get this. With the split screen approach this could be done without making a point of it. At times I agree the split screen wasn’t necessary in Conversation with other women, but by keeping it throughout, moments where it was adding something didn’t feel forced. The director argued the use of split-screen made the viewer more of a part in the “editing”, since they could shift focus. Considering what’s happening with story telling media today this actually seems like more of a small step in that direction rather than a revolutionary new way, and most of the time I did try to follow both of the perspectives, since I felt I would otherwise miss out on the vision. I’m convinced that further down the road this idea will reach it’s full potential though, and we wouldn’t get anywhere if it weren’t for small steps. Just to clarify, so you won’t think I despise...

New ideas

I’ve been thinking recently on trying to get a thesis done to earn a semester of literature science. Only problem is, well time for starters, but also to find a subject worth exploring. I think I might be on to something at last. The idea is to write about nothing, and no it has nothing to do with Seinfeld, at least to my knowledge so far. Rather about “closure”, the space between something being shown, that invites the audience, reader, participant to fill out the blanks. The other night I played throught the beginning of Fahrenheit on PC, and the cop is going to help an old lady, working on a diner, get home. The problem is, that she’s not wearing any out doors clothing and its freezing outside. The game makers obviuosly didn’t want to animate her putting on a coat just to get her out of the scene, but the fact is that such a minor detail can ruin the immersion into the story. One way around this would be to leave enough space for the audience to fill in the blank. Make her go towards the door, then cut and just “show” us the sound of the door being shut. Since it is probable that she put on the coat, we don’t have to react to the fact that she didn’t. You don’t have to show everything, sometimes suggesting and leaving the texturing and rendering to the...

All fun and no work makes Jack a dull…

Less time for editing than I thought this weekend. Spent time on theatre (student spex actually) and a role playing game, and spent a couple of hours cleaning up the work space (you can more or less see it soon). I’ll say a few things about the student farse I saw. It was a cross breed between West Side Story and a western movie, with Maria, Billy – the kid, Jolly Jumper, Dolly Parton, Clint Eastwood, to mention a few of the characters. The plot was confusing at best, but it dawned on me pretty soon that this was a good thing, at least not a bad one. The show was absolutely inhibited in breaking the conventions in how a play should be performed. The actors constantly asked for dialog, the directer pointed out faults in the play while it was being performed, the set fell apart and was constantly repaired during the show. All this while the cast constantly delivered funny, or pretty funny, lines that was part of something not really resembling a good plot. This way of performing is all the more appropriate considering that Swedish student spex contains elements such as the audience demanding the actors to do scenes in other ways, and booing if a particular bad joke is told. I truly enjoyed the anarchistic nature of the show. I might ponder some more on the phenomenon further down the road. The spex was fun, but as I said, I didn’t spend much time editing. And next week Thursday-Saturday I’ll be on The Dream Factory, organized byt the Swedish Film Institute. Need to work...

Open source films?

Saw a link to this article in the Telegraph posted at Thomas Crockers Avid blog, which I can recommend by the way. The article deals with what is called open source movies. The concept is neat somehow, but I also wonder if you’re even talking movies when you take this to an extreme. The article only brushes at this area with mentioning “Imagine being able to download a version of a Hollywood movie which you could play around with – cutting scenes and creating alternative endings.” (Telegraph.co.uk, 10 april 2007) Bordering on semantics this is still relevant in the way we tell our story. The movie as a medium is framed in time and space, but the freecutting experience is not, not if the process of recutting is the salespitch for these movies. If the recutted version of the film was shown for friends and family, and maybe even saw it’s way to YouTube it would be a film indeed, but, probably, a pretty irrelevant one. Regarding the process of making the film I welcome every new thought on the subject, and will follow the open source movement in filmmaking with interest. Hey, anything to get good stories told,...