Computer games aren’t games 1/2

Computer games aren’t games 1/2

There are no such thing as mediabound stories. Moby Dick is a novel, and it contains a story, but only if we read it that way. The novel itself is no story. Just as a chessboard and chess pieces isn’t the game of chess. In fact Moby Dick is just as much of a game as the chess pieces are. If two people are told to read the first 200 pages of Moby Dick as fast as they can and that the reader who reads the fastest, and have the most correct answers on a Quizz afterwords gets a 100 dollars, they aren’t only reading a story they are also playing a game (from now on called a Mobydash). In fact, chances are they are game players to a larger extent than they are story readers, since they have to adjust their reading in order to win. If the rules applied to the reading are rules of a game, the reading becomes a game, but it doesn’t end being a story. Chances are we read it both ways simultaneously, only with porer quality than if we hade just sticked to either game or story. In fact we absolutely have the possibility to do both at the same time, even though one of the process might be dominant. So the book is only a book and whether it is a story, game or play is all about how we use it. This principle is in very much applicable on computer games, but more on that later. Today I want to finnish off with cards. There are several activities that turn...