There’s no beginning, there’ll be no end

There’s no beginning, there’ll be no end

…truth can be found in sugar coated love songs no doubt. Where does the story of Mortimer och Randolph Duke in Coming to America begin? The spectator needs to know the characters from Trading Places to appreciate the scene, or at least understand the dialog of the two homeless gentlemen when they receive the money from prince Akeem. And where does the story end? “We’re back!” indicates the beginning of something. And where did the story of the Dukes in Trading Places end? Surely not in Trading Places since they’re back in Coming to America. Where does the story end in Eastern Promises and does it really happen on screen? Where does the story in i Sofokles tragedy Oedipus the King begin and end? What if George Lucas had never made Episode I-III? When Aristotle wrote: “A beginning is that which does not itself follow anything by causal necessity, but after which something naturally is or comes to be. An end, on the contrary, is that which itself naturally follows some other thing, either by necessity, or as a rule, but has nothing following it. A middle is that which follows something as some other thing follows it. A well constructed plot, therefore, must neither begin nor end at haphazard, but conform to these principles.” …he surely couldn’t have meant that literally, right? Maybe he really meant: “A beginning is where the writer chooses to begin, because if she begins earlier that which comes after will make less sense. An end, on the contrary, is where the writer chooses to end, because if she continue the thing in the...

All fun and no work makes Jack a dull…

Less time for editing than I thought this weekend. Spent time on theatre (student spex actually) and a role playing game, and spent a couple of hours cleaning up the work space (you can more or less see it soon). I’ll say a few things about the student farse I saw. It was a cross breed between West Side Story and a western movie, with Maria, Billy – the kid, Jolly Jumper, Dolly Parton, Clint Eastwood, to mention a few of the characters. The plot was confusing at best, but it dawned on me pretty soon that this was a good thing, at least not a bad one. The show was absolutely inhibited in breaking the conventions in how a play should be performed. The actors constantly asked for dialog, the directer pointed out faults in the play while it was being performed, the set fell apart and was constantly repaired during the show. All this while the cast constantly delivered funny, or pretty funny, lines that was part of something not really resembling a good plot. This way of performing is all the more appropriate considering that Swedish student spex contains elements such as the audience demanding the actors to do scenes in other ways, and booing if a particular bad joke is told. I truly enjoyed the anarchistic nature of the show. I might ponder some more on the phenomenon further down the road. The spex was fun, but as I said, I didn’t spend much time editing. And next week Thursday-Saturday I’ll be on The Dream Factory, organized byt the Swedish Film Institute. Need to work...